algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers


Jake Moore

When animals are killed or die they cross-over from object to substance; from body to meat and bones. The word animal finds its root in the Latin animalis “animate, living; of the air,” from anima “breath, soul; a current of air.” Speakers also breathe, literally inhaling and exhaling to excite a space, to give it life. But all sound, like life, is temporal; subject to entropy and decay.

The moral question of whether we have the right to raise the dead sounds ‘horror-ble’ or fantastical at first, but the question is closely bound to whether we have the right to take that life in the first place. Both a form of playing (with) god. While the dead animal can not generate it’s own breath, it can still resound.

Granular synthesis pulverises, dissects, dismembers, and minces sound. But granulation also prolongs what would normally be transient phenomena – sounds that live and die – and sustains them indefinitely; breathing life back into them. It holds the window between life and death open, indefinitely.

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