algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
Seth Kim-Cohen: Ambience and The End of the End of Art
Let the record show that, as I write this, I am listening to Brian Eno’s Ambient 1: Music For Airports (Editions EG, 1978).

FRI 19 Aug 2016
7pm
Greek Cultural Centre
168 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne VIC

FREE


Let the record show that, as I write this, I am listening to Brian Eno’s Ambient 1: Music For Airports (Editions EG, 1978). What follows is an attempt to disenvelop the term “ambient,” as a modifier of art practices. Three occurrences, in particular, suggest themselves as significantly unique – yet interrelated – employments of the term: Eno’s coinage in the mid-1970s; the phrase “ambient poetics,” which Timothy Morton has been using since the early 2000s; and the 2013 exhibition, ambient (lower case a), at Tanya Bonakdar Gallery. The press release for ambient , the exhibition, opens with the old saw: Brian Eno is stuck in his sickbed. The volume of the music playing in his room is too low. Eno struggles to make out the music amidst competing sounds. And Eno discovers a new way to listen:

This presented what was for me a new way of hearing music –  as part of the ambience of the environment just as the colour of the light and the sound of the rain were parts of that ambience.

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