algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
Johannes Kreidler: Outsourcing & Product Placement
Who actually composed this music?

FRI 19 Aug 2016
8PM
The Greek Centre for Contemporary Culture
168 Lonsdale St, Melbourne
Wheelchair Accessible

FREE


As part of Autotune Everything: Art and the Sonic – Cosmic – Politic 

program

Johannes Kreidler: Fremdarbeit (Outsourcing) (2009)
for 4 Instruments and Moderation

In 2009, I received a commission from Klangwerkstatt Berlin, for a new piece for a given instrumentation. Then, I searched on the Internet for composers in China offering their skills. I found a Chinese composer, whom I gave recent compositions of mine with the instructions that he should write in a style imitative of my music for that instrumentation. Then, I looked for a cheap programmer in India. I gave this composer the same pieces that I gave the Chinese composer; the Indian programmer was then asked to write software that would algorithmically imitate my music. A third task was that the Chinese composer should use the Indian programmer’s software…

One point of this concept is the question of authorship: Who actually composed this music? A second question concerns exploitation. Like industry does, I moved the production of my work into countries with cheap labour. I received €1500 for my commission, whereas for my workers in Asia who wrote the score I only had to pay $150.

Performers

Johannes Kreidler: Composer / moderator
Jacob Abela: Sampler Keyboard
Freya Schack-Arnott: Cello
Aawa White: Flute
Matthias Schack-Arnott: Percussion

Johannes Kreidler: product placements (2008)
for Moderation + Video

n 2008, I composed a 33-second-long elecronic piece, containing 70,200 samples from other people’s music. Consequently, I had to regiser that piece with 70,200 regisration forms where every part of the music that is not “from me” had to be mentioned and registered. As a sort of music theatre, with a truck full of paper, I drove to the GEMA (German APRA – recording industry association) and brought into quesion the problems of creativity and copyright in the digital age.

about

“For me, music never exists alone; a composer must always deal with interrelationships. Music deals with technology and the politics of technology, with consumption behaviour, and the cultural and economic value of art. These things play a role in my creative work; I use them as artistic material.” Johannes Kreidler

Berlin-based composer Johannes Kreidler works in the mode of ‘expanded composition’. His compositions, while musical, are not about music – but rather the systems, economies, and regimes of value that structure music’s place in our world. Pursuing this music/not music approach Kreidler has become a leading figure in musical ‘conceptualism’, an approach at the intersection of composition and conceptual art.

While in Melbourne, Johannes Kreidler is a guest of the RMIT international Artist in Residence program (iAIRt).

Johannes Kreidler is generously supported in Australia by the Goethe Institut.

Supported by Speak Percussion

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