algorhythmically
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algorhythmically
determined
creatively
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authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
alternative
tenant
farmers
algorhythmically
determined
creatively
industrial
authentically
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farmers
Text of Sound
Text of sound (describing [imagined] sounds of an [absent] image) with Brian Fuata, Agatha Gothe-Snape, Astrid Lorange, Salomé Voegelin, Catherine Clover.

Throughout September 2014
Daily
Federation Square Big Screen

Free

Subtitle — Caption — Text of Sound

documentation

Subtitling ([mis-]translating/explaining sounds of a present image) * Dialogue * some sound effects * voiceovers * intercultural + Captioning (describing sounds of a present image) Also see: assistive listening * dialogue * sound effects/foley * hearing impaired < Text of sound (describing [imagined] sounds of an [absent] image)

Brian Fuata; YOU THE CROUD SCHTOOD LOUD HEAR OUT FOR BURGLARY
Astrid Lorange; DINNER RAT
Salomé Voegelin; MELBOURNE SOUNDWORDS
Catherine Clover; MELBOURNE SOUNDWORDS

Text animations by Rebecca Ross

 

Federation Square is one of the many ‘acoustic territories’ that make up inner-city Melbourne. However, its everydayness (thousands of commuters and visitors passing through, every day) can obscure its specificity, as a relatively recent (2002) major civic intervention (capacity: 15,000) that’s reliant on its successful operation of the kind of public and private partnering typical of late neoliberal regimes like ours. As a space, it resonates with the almost constant movement of bodies, light, litter – and wind. Sound is, more or less, mostly mangled, meaning the attention of spectators is functionally directed toward the visual. And at the top of the visual hierarchy of Federation Square, above the stage, is the Big Screen. No matter how banal or coercive its content may be, it seems to (as screens always do, don’t they?) command our attention. Sound is the subtext. Thus, the screen speaks mutely, to offer itself to us – viewer, artist – as a site for inscription, projection, dissolution.